Raise a smile (Children 1st)



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Children’s rights

  1. Right to be born
  2. Right to have a name,nationality and identity
  3. Right to Health and nutrition
  4. Right to parental care and support
  5. Right to privacy
  6. Right to education
  7. Right to play and leisure
  8. Right to be protected from all forms of violence and exploitation
  9. Right to express views and opinions
  10. Right to conscience,thought and religion
  11. Right to participation

Short animation by the Children’s Rights Alliance on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC). The animation is aimed at children.

Children is the hope of our future.

Inspired by a true story.

Stop-motion I edited for a friend. Drawings and concept by Caleb Pantoja. Voice by ma soeur.

CHILDREN’S RIGHTS -Our Struggle to fight for the rights of children

A street performer in Lahore named Akhtar shows a crowd his newest trick - he stands on top of his 4 year old niece with his full weight while she lies on the ground filled with broken glass.
The Ansar Burney Trust had the girl taken away from his custody and Akhtar was arrested. We are currently appealing to the government to ban such “magic” acts involving children.

CHILDREN’S RIGHTS -
Our Struggle to fight for the rights of children

A street performer in Lahore named Akhtar shows a crowd his newest trick - he stands on top of his 4 year old niece with his full weight while she lies on the ground filled with broken glass.

The Ansar Burney Trust had the girl taken away from his custody and Akhtar was arrested. We are currently appealing to the government to ban such “magic” acts involving children.


LDV United recently worked on a pro bono basis to create awareness of Zuster Jeanne Devos, a fund to fight the exploitation of Indian girls.
Sister Jeanne Devos and her charity defend children’s rights, looking after malnourished and often abused girls. She works tirelessly to give thousands of traumatised children back their dignity. Kagila, pictured in the campaign, is just a child and has been working for over half her life. She is one of millions of Indian servant girls who are exploited like slaves working seven days a week with no time to play.
LDV United created a print campaign for magazines and billboards. In total they donated pro bono time, media space and photography worth over €180,500.
The campaign was so successful it was selected as one of the 24 non-profit ads from among more than 150 submissions for the annual solidarity prize awarded by De Standaard, the leading Belgian newspaper. Between July and September 2008 when the campaign ran, the fund’s website (www.zusterjeannedevos.org/) recorded an average of 300 unique visitors a day. In 2007, they had about 30 unique visitors a day during that same period. In July and August 2008, they received 150 gifts of €30, against none at all during the same period in 2007.

LDV United recently worked on a pro bono basis to create awareness of Zuster Jeanne Devos, a fund to fight the exploitation of Indian girls.

Sister Jeanne Devos and her charity defend children’s rights, looking after malnourished and often abused girls. She works tirelessly to give thousands of traumatised children back their dignity. Kagila, pictured in the campaign, is just a child and has been working for over half her life. She is one of millions of Indian servant girls who are exploited like slaves working seven days a week with no time to play.

LDV United created a print campaign for magazines and billboards. In total they donated pro bono time, media space and photography worth over €180,500.

The campaign was so successful it was selected as one of the 24 non-profit ads from among more than 150 submissions for the annual solidarity prize awarded by De Standaard, the leading Belgian newspaper. Between July and September 2008 when the campaign ran, the fund’s website (www.zusterjeannedevos.org/) recorded an average of 300 unique visitors a day. In 2007, they had about 30 unique visitors a day during that same period. In July and August 2008, they received 150 gifts of €30, against none at all during the same period in 2007.


If children are deprived and denied of their rights, their full potential will not be realized. This is Plan International’s definition of Child Poverty. For Plan, the common issues on children according to the 4 broad rights are survival, development, protection, and participation.
The challenge of education comes under the issue on Development. These challenges that Plan tackle under this human right are poor quality of basic education, limited access to educational services, inadequate financial resources for education, and inadequate facilities for education.
Plan’s ultimate goal to address these issues is social transformation by making its partner communities become Child-Friendly. A community is child-friendly when it is able to assure the rights and needs of the children on survival, development, protection, and participation. This desired result is also equal to addressing child poverty.
One of Plan’s major Country Program Outlines (CPOs) is Child-Learn. To address the issues confronting public elementary education, especially in the rural areas, Plan challenges itself to institutionalize and sustain programs and projects that are designed for quality and access to education.
To concretize this challenge, Plan has instituted the Child-Centered Community Development Approach (CCCDA), a rights-based approach in which children, families and communities are active and leading participants in their own development. This enhances their capacity and opportunity to work together with others to address structural causes and consequences of child poverty at all levels.

If children are deprived and denied of their rights, their full potential will not be realized. This is Plan International’s definition of Child Poverty. For Plan, the common issues on children according to the 4 broad rights are survival, development, protection, and participation.

The challenge of education comes under the issue on Development. These challenges that Plan tackle under this human right are poor quality of basic education, limited access to educational services, inadequate financial resources for education, and inadequate facilities for education.

Plan’s ultimate goal to address these issues is social transformation by making its partner communities become Child-Friendly. A community is child-friendly when it is able to assure the rights and needs of the children on survival, development, protection, and participation. This desired result is also equal to addressing child poverty.

One of Plan’s major Country Program Outlines (CPOs) is Child-Learn. To address the issues confronting public elementary education, especially in the rural areas, Plan challenges itself to institutionalize and sustain programs and projects that are designed for quality and access to education.

To concretize this challenge, Plan has instituted the Child-Centered Community Development Approach (CCCDA), a rights-based approach in which children, families and communities are active and leading participants in their own development. This enhances their capacity and opportunity to work together with others to address structural causes and consequences of child poverty at all levels.

The Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC) is the body of independent experts that monitors implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child by its State parties. It also monitors implementation of two optional protocols to the Convention, on involvement of children in armed conflict and on sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography.
All States parties are obliged to submit regular reports to the Committee on how the rights are being implemented. States must report initially two years after acceding to the Convention and then every five years. The Committee examines each report and addresses its concerns and recommendations to the State party in the form of “concluding observations”.
The Committee reviews additional reports which must be submitted by States who have acceded to the two Optional Protocols to the Convention.
The Committee cannot consider individual complaints, although child rights may be raised before other committees with competence to consider individual complaints.
The Committee meets in Geneva and normally holds three sessions per year consisting of a three-week plenary and a one-week pre-session working group. In 2010, the Committee considered reports in two parallel chambers of 9 members each, “as an exceptional and temporary measure”, in order to clear the backlog of reports.
The Committee also publishes its interpretation of the content of human rights provisions, known as general comments on thematic issues and organizes days of general discussion.

The Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC) is the body of independent experts that monitors implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child by its State parties. It also monitors implementation of two optional protocols to the Convention, on involvement of children in armed conflict and on sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography.

All States parties are obliged to submit regular reports to the Committee on how the rights are being implemented. States must report initially two years after acceding to the Convention and then every five years. The Committee examines each report and addresses its concerns and recommendations to the State party in the form of “concluding observations”.

The Committee reviews additional reports which must be submitted by States who have acceded to the two Optional Protocols to the Convention.


The Committee cannot consider individual complaints, although child rights may be raised before other committees with competence to consider individual complaints.

The Committee meets in Geneva and normally holds three sessions per year consisting of a three-week plenary and a one-week pre-session working group. In 2010, the Committee considered reports in two parallel chambers of 9 members each, “as an exceptional and temporary measure”, in order to clear the backlog of reports.

The Committee also publishes its interpretation of the content of human rights provisions, known as general comments on thematic issues and organizes days of general discussion.

UNICEF : For Every Child
No Progress for West African Children in 15 Years
Are the children in the West Africa worse off than they where 15 years ago, despite legislations enacted to safeguard children’s rights. According to a 6-8 November conference held in Burkina Faso, to assess the progress made by governments to implement the Convention on the Rights of the Child. After an assessment of governments in West Africa it was quickly realized that little had been done to improve children’s rights in the region.

UNICEF : For Every Child

No Progress for West African Children in 15 Years

  • Are the children in the West Africa worse off than they where 15 years ago, despite legislations enacted to safeguard children’s rights. According to a 6-8 November conference held in Burkina Faso, to assess the progress made by governments to implement the Convention on the Rights of the Child. After an assessment of governments in West Africa it was quickly realized that little had been done to improve children’s rights in the region.

Children’s Rights

Children are young human beings. Some children are very young human beings. As human beings children evidently have a certain moral status. There are things that should not be done to them for the simple reason that they are human. At the same time children are different from adult human beings and it seems reasonable to think that there are things children may not do that adults are permitted to do. In the majority of jurisdictions, for instance, children are not allowed to vote, to marry, to buy alcohol, to have sex, or to engage in paid employment. What makes children a special case for philosophical consideration is this combination of their humanity and their youth, or, more exactly, what is thought to be associated with their youth. One very obvious way in which the question of what children are entitled to do or to be or to have is raised is by asking, Do children have rights? If so, do they have all the rights that adults have and do they have rights that adults do not have? If they do not have rights how do we ensure that they are treated in the morally right way? Most jurisdictions accord children legal rights. Most countries—though not the United States of America—have ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child which was first adopted in 1989. The Convention accords to children a wide range of rights including, most centrally, the right to have their ‘best interests’ be ‘a primary consideration’ in all actions concerning them (Article 3), the ‘inherent right to life’ (Article 6), and the right of a child “who is capable of forming his or her own views … to express these views freely in all matters affecting the child” (Article 12) (United Nations 1989). However it is normal to distinguish between ‘positive’ rights, those that are recognised in law, and ‘moral’ rights, those that are recognised by some moral theory. That children have ‘positive’ rights does not then settle the question of whether they do or should have moral rights. Indeed the idea of children as rights holders has been subject to different kinds of philosophical criticism At the same time there has been philosophical consideration of what kinds of rights children have if they do have any rights at all. The various debates shed light on both the nature and value of rights, and on the moral status of children.